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I Was Looking Forward to a Quiet Old Age

They say that revolutions are for the young. That’s probably a truism when you look at the French Revolution and even to contemporary ones like Egypt’s “Arab Spring.” It may also apply to resistance movements during periods of conflict. When one studies the French Resistance during the German Occupation, it becomes clear very quickly that most resistance members are young (thirty-five or younger).

Etta Shiber. Photo by anonymus (c. 1943). From the book Paris-Underground.
Etta Shiber. Photo by anonymus (c. 1943). From the book Paris-Underground.

That is until you meet Etta Shiber, a 62-year old widow and former Manhattan housewife, who lived in Paris with her best friend before and during the Occupation—with the exception of the time she spent in a Gestapo prison.


Did You Know?

After nearly 600 years in England, a medieval ring belonging to Joan of Arc was returned to France. On the eve of her execution in May 1413, she gave the ring to an English cardinal. Throughout the centuries it was bought and sold multiple times. On 4 March 2016, it came back to France after an organization successfully bid $425,000 at auction. Reportedly, there is sufficient documentation to authenticate the ring as belonging to Joan.


Kitty

Etta and her husband traveled to Paris every year for a three-month stay. While there in 1925, she met Kitty who was to become her best friend. Kitty Beaurepos, the daughter of a London banker, was an English society woman who married young. Moving to Italy, she and her husband had a son but shortly after, her first husband passed away and Kitty moved to Paris. She married a Frenchman but then amicably separated. Kitty eventually opened a small dress shop on Rue Rodier where she catered to Americans and this is where the two women met.

Every year on her annual trip to Paris, Etta would call on Kitty. In 1933, Etta traveled to Paris without her husband but did take her ill brother. Irving became so ill that Kitty had to bring in the best medical help that Paris had to offer. Alas, it wasn’t enough and Irving died (he was buried in the Père Lachaise cemetery). William Shiber died three years later leaving Etta a widow. Kitty invited her to move to Paris and live with her at 2, rue Balny d’Avricourt in one of Paris’s more exclusive neighborhoods (near the Arc de Triomphe).

Exterior of apartment building where Etta and Kitty lived. Photo by Google Maps (date unknown).
Exterior of apartment building where Etta and Kitty lived. Photo by Google Maps (date unknown).

The Germans

For three years, Kitty and Etta’s lifestyle was calm, happy, and without any acrimony. That is, until 1 September 1939 when the Nazis began dropping their bombs on Poland and invaded the country. England and France almost immediately declared war against Germany. Kitty tried to talk Etta into returning to America but she refused. The next day, the two women joined the Foyer du Soldat—the French equivalent of our U.S.O.

For eight months after the invasion of Poland nothing happened. France would sit back as if nothing was amiss—they were in the middle of the drôle de guerre or “phony war.” The French government was confident that any German attack would be repelled by their army and by the Maginot Line. That is until mid-spring 1940 when the German Wehrmacht (army) and Luftwaffe (air force) began to quickly sweep into the neighboring Low-Countries, including France. It took only six weeks for the Nazis to conquer France (almost two million French soldiers were taken prisoner).

Flight From Paris

As the Germans approached the city, almost everyone in Paris fled south or west. They went by car, bike, or foot pulling their belongings behind them. The narrow roads became so congested that going only a few feet would take hours. Within days, the Luftwaffe sent in fighters to strafe the refugees fleeing their city.

Kitty and Etta followed everyone else. They hopped into Kitty’s car and began their slow journey south. Giving up on the main road after several days, Kitty turned the car onto an alternate route. However, by the next day the women decided it best to get back to the south-bound road. They reached it just in time to be attacked from the sky by Luftwaffe planes. Strafing the road, the German pilots killed scores of men, women, and children.

Rather than move on, most of the people (including Kitty and Etta) stayed where they were. Reports of the German troop movements made it clear they were trapped. Eventually, the German parade of soldiers caught up to them. A soldier on motorcycle drove up to the car and told them to return to Paris. So, Kitty and Etta turned around and began to drive back to Paris. Along the way they passed captured French soldiers standing alongside the roads guarded by the Germans. In some cases, these prisoners included English or R.A.F pilots—undoubtedly the ones who couldn’t get off Dunkirk beach.

William Gray

Paris had capitulated without a fight. The French government deserted the city for Bordeaux and declared Paris to be an “open” city. The Germans marched in without a shot being fired during the early morning of 14 June 1940. By the evening, the occupation forces had settled in. Kitty and Etta knew all about the recent events when they decided to stop at an inn to eat on their way back to Paris.

The innkeeper was very nervous. He told them he was hiding an English pilot and they all knew the Germans were hunting down these pilots. His name was William Gray and he had been stranded at Dunkirk. Kitty and Etta decided to take him back to Paris with them since he fit perfectly in the trunk of the car. They took the risk because Etta thought he looked like her deceased brother.

Along the way, they were stopped several times but the German sentries never bothered to open the trunk. They stashed Gray in their apartment. A week after they returned, a Gestapo agent and two French civilians knocked at their door. They were conducting a house-by-house search for downed English pilots. Etta passed Gray off as her sick brother using Irving’s identification papers. Their visitors left but noted that “Irving” now lived in the apartment.

Paris was still relatively empty but their friend, Chancel, was at his apartment when they contacted him for help in smuggling Gray out of the city and into the hands of the Resistance. They were quickly to find out that Chancel ran a refuge for people in hiding. They devised a plan to smuggle Gray to the border and freedom. The plan worked.

Missing Persons Ad

The women decided to go into the human smuggling business full time. They took out ads in the “Missing Persons” section of the German run newspaper Paris-Soir which read “William Gray, formerly of Dunkirk, is seeking his friends and relatives.” The ad attracted attention of Father Christian Ravier who, over time, supplied Etta and Kitty with soldiers hiding in the woods. By the fall of 1940, the women had successfully transported more than 150 men to safety and freedom.

Betrayed

Five months after bringing William Gray to their apartment, Kitty and Etta were betrayed. On the morning of 26 November 1940, a Gestapo agent knocked on their door. Only Etta was home and she was immediately arrested (Kitty would often leave for extended periods of time to make transfer arrangements with the Resistance). Brought to the Hôtel Matignon (one of the sites you’ll visit in my new book Where Did They Put the Gestapo Headquarters?), Etta met Captain Pietsch and Dr. Hager, two Gestapo officers who played the “good guy, bad guy” interrogation game with her. Two hours after Etta’s arrest, Father Christian, and Chancel were picked up by the Gestapo. Kitty managed to elude the hunters but only for the time being.

Prison and Certain Death

Etta was taken to the military prison, Cherche-Midi, where political prisoners were interred (the 120-year old prison located on Rue du Cherche-Midi was demolished in 1966). She was no longer Mrs. Etta Shiber but Prisoner Number 1876. After about two weeks, Etta was released but constantly followed by the Gestapo hoping she would lead them to Kitty. By mid-December 1940, the Gestapo found Kitty (without Etta’s help) and they arrested Mrs. Shiber once more. The Nazis now had the four “ring leaders” in custody.

All four were brought before the Nazi court in March 1941 at the Hôtel de Brienne (14, rue Saint-Dominique). Etta was charged with “aiding the escape into the free zone of military fugitives.” The United States had yet to enter the war against the Germans so Etta got off with a sentence of three years at hard labor. Chancel received five years. The other two were not as lucky. Kitty and Father Christian each received the death penalty.

Etta was transferred to the notorious Fresnes prison where she was expected to serve her sentence. As the weather turned colder, the Germans transferred her to a prison located in Troyes, France. The date was 7 December 1941. Etta was now an enemy of the Nazis.

The Exchange

The fourteen months in captivity since the trial were hard on Etta. She suffered from an irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure, and she had her first heart attack in February 1942. Her second attack came two months later. She dropped almost forty pounds but her smoking habit had been broken. Etta was released a second time and returned to Paris. In May 1942, she learned the reason why the Gestapo had let her out.

Etta was required to check in daily at the Kommandantur du Gross-Paris in the Place de l’Opéra (again, one of the stops in the next book). On 17 May at her daily visit, a German officer informed her that she was to leave that day to return to America. After waiting in the train at Hendaye (France) on the border with Spain for what seemed an eternity (it was actually a couple of days), Etta saw another train pull into the station after crossing the international bridge. A German military band had arrived to greet it along with the black Mercedes cars carrying Nazi dignitaries. Shortly after, a woman walked off the train and headed directly to the lead Mercedes.

Photos of Nazi spies captured by the FBI. Johanna Hoffmann is second from the left. Photos by anonymous (c. 1939). Federal Bureau of Investigation. PD-U.S. Government.
Photos of Nazi spies captured by the FBI. Johanna Hoffmann is second from the left. Photos by anonymous (c. 1939). Federal Bureau of Investigation. PD-U.S. Government.

Mrs. Etta Shriber had been exchanged by the United States government for one of the Nazis’ most notorious spies, Johanna Hoffmann. The famous spy was part of a Nazi espionage ring operating in America. She was caught and convicted of spying and given a four-year sentence in 1939.

Post-War

Etta returned to New York where she lived out her remaining years. She wrote about her experiences in Paris-Underground. Since the book was published in the middle of the war (1943), certain names were changed to protect her friends. Kitty was really Catherine (Kate) Bonnefous (nee Robins). Father Christian was an alias and his real name was never divulged. William Gray’s real name was used in the book because he was safely back in England and the Nazis couldn’t touch him.

Etta died three years after the war ended (no doubt from prison ailments) without ever knowing if her friend Kitty had survived—which she did but with permanent scars on her body to show for her time with the Gestapo. Father Christian was one hour away from being executed when two Gestapo agents showed up to transfer him. Believe it or not, they weren’t with the Gestapo. They were British MI6 agents dressed like and flashing Gestapo identity cards. They had come to rescue Father Christian. He was offered transportation to England but refused. He wanted to return to his village and continue his resistance work. No one ever heard from him again.

When Etta returned to America, she was hailed as a hero. All she said was “I was looking forward to a quiet old age.”

Original cover of “Paris-Underground” by Etta Shiber. Photo by anonymous (c. 1943).Original cover of “Paris-Underground” by Etta Shiber. Photo by anonymous (c. 1943).
Original cover of “Paris-Underground” by Etta Shiber. Photo by anonymous (c. 1943).Original cover of “Paris-Underground” by Etta Shiber. Photo by anonymous (c. 1943).
Studio poster for the movie “Paris-Underground.” Photo by anonymous (c. 1945).
Studio poster for the movie “Paris-Underground.” Photo by anonymous (c. 1945).

Recommended Reading and Viewing

Shiber, Etta. Paris−Underground. New York: Press Alliance, Inc., 1943.

Bennett, Constance (producer). Paris-Underground. Starring Constance Bennett and Gracie Fields. United Artists. Based on the novel by Etta Shiber. 1945.

Notice the date Etta’s book was published? Yep, she wrote it shortly after returning to America and right in the middle of the war. Many of the names have been changed to protect the identities of people who remained in German occupied territories. The book is dedicated to “Kitty.”

What’s New With Sandy and Stew?

Most of the soldiers that Etta and Kitty saved were English. These men tried to get out of France during the Dunkirk evacuation but were never able to get on any of the ships. There were thousands of them looking for a way to return to England.

We have a special blog next week from our friend Denis Caron. The blog is about the last soldier to return home from Dunkirk. You’ll learn about Bill Lacey and his adventures eluding the Germans after being stranded on Dunkirk beach. Denis is the author of Dash for Dunkirk.

Someone Is Commenting On Our Blogs

If there is a topic you’d like to see a blog written about, please don’t hesitate to contact me. I love hearing from you so keep those comments coming.

 It’s Here Now! 

Where Did They Burn The Last Grand Master of the Knights Templar? A Walking Tour of Medieval Paris. Volume Two.

Medieval Volume Two Cover

Learn more here.  Buy here.

 

Why Would You Want To Buy Our “Walks Through History” Books?

Simple.

You like to travel and experience history and historical events. You like to see original buildings that had a significant impact on the people and events of the history you’re engaged with. You want to know the stories behind the brick and mortar in front of you.

The walking tour books are meticulously researched so you can go directly to those sites and learn about the building’s history as well as an introduction to some of the more interesting people associated with it.

Thank You

Sandy and I appreciate you visiting with us. We have some exciting things on the horizon and we’ll keep you updated as we go along.

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Noah’s Ark

Official stamp of the Réseau Alliance. Photo by anonymous (date unknown).
Official stamp of the Réseau Alliance. Photo by anonymous (date unknown).

My attention is always drawn to stories about the brave members of the resistance movements who fought the Germans in their respective occupied countries. These men and women were always aware of their potential fatal outcomes if caught but largely ignored it to continue the fight for liberation. I’ve written in the past about some of these fighters including Nancy Wake (read blog), the Boulloche sisters (read blog), the Sussex Plan (read blog), Rose Valland (read blog), and the SOE—Special Operations Executive (read blog).

Today, I’ll introduce you to the remarkable Hedgehog and the other animals of Noah’s Ark, one of the most successful résistance réseaux (resistance networks) operating in France during the German Occupation.


Did you Know?

Nazi concentration camp prisoners (i.e., those chosen for labor and not sent directly to the gas chambers) received a number tattooed on their arm. The misconception is that all camps tattooed their prisoners. That is not true. Only Auschwitz and two of its sub camps, Birkenau and Monowitz, practiced tattooing the prisoners. Learn more in our next blog, The Auschwitz Tattooist.


 The French Resistance

Most people have the mistaken idea that the French resistance movement was a single organization comprised of men and women with the same motivation: identify and sabotage strategic German targets for the purpose of driving the occupiers out of France. It’s not that simple.

Strasbourg France memorial for the Réseau Alliance agents executed by the Nazis on 23 November 1944. Photo by Rolf Krahl (2014). © Rolf Krahl. PD-Creative Commons license CC BY 4.0. Wikimedia Commons.
Strasbourg France memorial for the Réseau Alliance agents executed by the Nazis on 23 November 1944. Photo by Rolf Krahl (2014). © Rolf Krahl. PD-Creative Commons license CC BY 4.0. Wikimedia Commons.

The French Resistance movement was largely comprised of hundreds of independent networks, each with its own set of politics, motivations, and specific purposes. These networks were Communist, apolitical, right-leaning, left-leaning, and Christian democratic. Resistance activity began to gain strength after Hitler attacked Soviet positions in eastern Poland on 22 June 1941 in violation of the terms of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact. Prior to the German attack, French communist resistance activities were not allowed by Moscow.

Eventually, Charles de Gaulle assigned Jean Moulin the task of uniting and organizing the various resistance networks. In May 1943, Moulin created the Conseil National de la Résistance (CNR) under which the primary networks would coordinate their activities with the Free French Forces of the Interior.

The Alliance Network

Georges Loustaunau-Lacau alias “Navarre.” Photo by anonymous (date unknown).
Georges Loustaunau-Lacau alias “Navarre.” Photo by anonymous (date unknown).

Georges Loustaunau-Lacau (1894−1955) was a right-wing, anti-communist French army officer and member of La Cagoule. During the 1930s, Navarre (Loustaunau-Lacau’s nom de guerre or combat pseudonym) had founded a publishing company called L’Ordre National and began publishing a magazine warning his fellow citizens about Hitler and Germany’s intentions. In September 1939, a very remarkable woman, not yet thirty years old, Marie-Madeleine Fourcade (1909−1989) was running the company almost single handedly after having been its editor and general-secretary since 1937. Once France was occupied, the company was shuttered.

After the Germans occupied France and the Vichy government was established, Navarre asked Marie-Madeleine to lead a new resistance movement called the Alliance Network. Reluctantly, she agreed and at the height of network’s activities against the Germans, Marie-Madeleine was leading approximately 3,000 partisans throughout France.

The Hôtel des Sports

Navarre stepped away from his day-to-day leadership role in Alliance to head up a new organization (sponsored and supported by Pétain and Vichy). The Hôtel des Sports was the location of the Légion française des combattants which Navarre ran as an undercover operation while overseeing the Alliance Network. Through this group, Navarre was able to recruit new agents and gather intelligence which was then passed onto the Alliance Network and ultimately, London. Navarre was arrested several times by Vichy with his last arrest resulting in imprisonment at the Mauthausen concentration camp where he would remarkably survive the war.

Marie-Madeleine Fourcade. Photo by anonymous (date unknown).
Marie-Madeleine Fourcade. Photo by anonymous (date unknown).

Simultaneously, Marie-Madeleine was organizing Alliance into sectors and personnel within the unoccupied zone. Next, she tackled the occupied zone with its labyrinth of network cells. As a woman operating in a “man’s world,” Marie-Madeleine had to overcome the prejudice of both the men she led in the network as well as the British leaders of MI6, MI9, and SOE. She quickly proved to all concerned that her skills, both organizational and strategic, as well as her ability to quickly assess personalities were unmatched.

Noah’s Ark

Marie-Madeleine used code letters and numbers to identify her agents. She was known as POZ/55. The organization grew rapidly under Marie-Madeleine’s leadership. As with most of the large French resistance networks, it was virtually impossible to keep traitors and informants from infiltrating the group. In the case of Alliance, it was a radio operator. After the arrests of many Alliance agents, Marie-Madeleine took immediate steps to re-organize the network. She changed its structure from a centralized to a decentralized one with each cell operating independently. Another change was to assign all agents with a new code name. At that point, every agent’s pseudonym became an animal name. Marie-Madeleine became “Hedgehog.” Other adopted names were Ermine, Magpie, Eagle, Tiger, Spaniel, Seagull, and so on.

War-time identity card of Marie Suzanne Umbert (real name: Marie-Madeleine Fourcade). Photo by anonymous (date unknown).
War-time identity card of Marie Suzanne Umbert (real name: Marie-Madeleine Fourcade). Photo by anonymous (date unknown).

Days before the Nazis marched into the Occupied Zone in November 1942, Marie-Madeleine and Alliance undertook a dangerous mission to transport General Henri Giraud to Gibraltar for a meeting with General Eisenhower. This attracted the attention of Vichy and Marie-Madeleine was arrested. Sympathetic Vichy police permitted her and the others to escape thereby avoiding certain execution at the hands of the Gestapo.

Card issued in 1948 identifying François Marquier (1912−1973) as a member of the Réseau Alliance. Notice it has been signed by Marie-Madeleine in the lower right corner. Photo by Rmarquier (2010). PD-Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Wikimedia Commons.
Card issued in 1948 identifying François Marquier (1912−1973) as a member of the Réseau Alliance. Notice it has been signed by Marie-Madeleine in the lower right corner. Photo by Rmarquier (2010). PD-Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Wikimedia Commons.
Léon Faye. Chief of staff for Marie-Madeleine. Code name: Eagle. Photo by anonymous (date unknown). Accord de B.MICHAUX Secrétaire général de l’AEMA. PD-Creative Commons CCO 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication. Wikimedia Commons.
Léon Faye. Chief of staff for Marie-Madeleine. Code name: Eagle. Photo by anonymous (date unknown). Accord de B.MICHAUX Secrétaire général de l’AEMA. PD-Creative Commons CCO 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication. Wikimedia Commons.

The Nazis knew her name, her leadership position, and the location where she operated from. They also knew quite a bit about the Alliance Network and named it “Noah’s Ark” because of the agents’ animal nom de guerre. Due to her important position and the fact the Gestapo was closing in on her, British intelligence insisted Marie-Madeleine return to London. While reluctant to leave France, Marie-Madeleine flew to England in 1943 after two years in charge of Alliance. She would stay there for one year while continuing to coordinate the activities of Alliance and her “animal” agents. Alliance’s chief of staff, Léon “Eagle” Faye (1899−1945) remained behind to carry out her orders. Col. Faye was eventually arrested, moved to a prison in Poland, and executed along with 800 other prisoners by the SS on 30 January 1945 as the Nazis began to flee from the encroaching Soviet army.

A Return to France

A month after D-Day (6 June 1944), Marie-Madeleine returned to France to resume her active leadership of Alliance. Almost immediately, Marie-Madeleine was arrested by the Gestapo. She knew the interrogation would be brutal and the end result would be death. So, the night before the interrogations were to begin, Hedgehog escaped by stripping off her clothes and wiggling out between the bars of her cell.

Approximately 500 of the Alliance Network died at the hands of the Nazis. The majority of them were sent to the Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp, the only extermination camp located on French soil. The camp was built to house captured partisans, foreign agents (e.g., SOE), victims of the German “Nacht und Nebel” program (read blog), and Jews who were used in Nazi medical experiments. Women accounted for around 17 percent of the total Alliance agents. Almost 50 of these women were executed.

Plaque at Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp commemorating the 107 Alliance agents executed by the Nazis. Photo by Claude Truong-Ngoc (4 April 2013). ©Claude Truong-Ngoc. PD-Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Wikimedia Commons.
Plaque at Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp commemorating the 107 Alliance agents executed by the Nazis. Photo by Claude Truong-Ngoc (4 April 2013). ©Claude Truong-Ngoc. PD-Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Wikimedia Commons.
Morgue room at Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp. Wall plaques commemorate the Alliance agents executed at the camp. Photo by Claude Truong-Ngoc (4 April 2013). ©Claude Truong-Ngoc. PD-Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Wikimedia Commons.
Morgue room at Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp. Wall plaques commemorate the Alliance agents executed at the camp. Photo by Claude Truong-Ngoc (4 April 2013). ©Claude Truong-Ngoc. PD-Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Wikimedia Commons.

Noah’s Ark’s contributions to the Allied war effort were immense. The network provided intelligence information on German submarines and ship movements. An important piece of information turned over to London was a detailed map of the German defenses in Normandy. One of Marie-Madeleine’s female agents gathered substantial information on the secret production of the V-1 and V-2 rockets which assisted in the Allied efforts to destroy Peenemünde.

Post-War and Death

At the end of the war, Marie-Madeleine and Navarre were discussing their plans for the future. Navarre wanted to go into politics and he successfully achieved that goal. For Marie-Madeleine, her life would be dedicated to carrying on the fight to ensure the children of France would never have to endure the hardships or risks recently experienced by France and the world under the jackboot of the Nazis.

Madame Fourcade played a major role in supporting Charles de Gaulle and in the 1970s, she became president of the Action Committee of the Resistance. During the 1980s, Marie-Madeleine was instrumental in aligning France with the United States and the Strategic Defense Initiative. She felt, rightfully, that France and the world had paid a terrible price to recover their countries and to defend “the dignity of man and his fundamental rights.” Marie-Madeleine would do anything to see that there was never a repeat of fascism or Nazism.

Marie-Madeleine lived to be eighty and died in Paris. She is buried in the family (Bridou) plot located in Père Lachaise cemetery. As one of the most important leaders of the French Resistance (and one of its few women in a leadership role), Marie-Madeleine Fourcade earned France’s highest honors including the Legion of Honor, the Medal of the Resistance, and the Croix de Guerre.

Frankly, this is a woman who should be buried in one of France’s most honored burial sites: either the Panthéon or Les Invalides (her funeral service occurred here).

Tomb of family Bridou: Marie-Madeleine Fourcade’s grave in Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris. Photo by Pierre-Yves Beaudouin (2016). PD-Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International. Wikimedia Commons.
Tomb of family Bridou: Marie-Madeleine Fourcade’s grave in Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris. Photo by Pierre-Yves Beaudouin (2016). PD-Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International. Wikimedia Commons.

Recommended Reading

Atwood, Kathryn J. Women Heroes of World War II. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2011.

Fourcade, Marie-Madeleine. Translated from the French by Kenneth Morgan. Noah’s Ark. New York: E.P. Dutton & Company, Inc., 1974.

Rossiter, Margaret L. Women in the Resistance. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1986.

What’s New With Sandy and Stew?

We were able to see our nephew, Dan Owen, over the holidays (he came out to Florida to visit his grandfather). You may recall that Dan accompanied us on our research trips to Paris for the first four books: Where Did They Put the Guillotine? Volumes 1 & 2; Where Did They Burn the Last Grand Master of the Knights Templar? Volumes 1 & 2. Dan is a professional photographer and shot all the contemporary images for the four books.

Unfortunately, he was not able to go with us this past September for our research on the next two books: Where Did They Put the Gestapo Headquarters? Volumes 1 & 2. We told Dan we really wanted him to do the photos for the seventh book, Where Did They Bury Jim Morrison, the Lizard King? A Walking Tour of Curious Paris Cemeteries.

We need some creepy photos for that book and Dan does creepy photos well.

Someone Is Commenting On Our Blogs

I was researching where Georges Loustaunau-Lacau was buried when I came across a blog site called Heroines of World War II. It is a very interesting site but much to my surprise, included along with the blogger’s other posts was my blog The Last Train Out of Paris (read blog). At the end of the blog, she did reference www.stewross.com.

Now I always appreciate the exposure but I was kind of taken back. If the tables had been reversed, I would have contacted the blog’s author and asked permission to include it in my blog site. A discussion like that might have opened up further opportunities for both of us. Oh well.

If there is a topic you’d like to see a blog written about, please don’t hesitate to contact me. I love hearing from you so keep those comments coming.

Why Would You Want To Buy Our “Walks Through History” Books?

Simple.

You like to travel and experience history and historical events. You like to see original buildings that had a significant impact on the people and events of the history you’re engaged with. You want to know the stories behind the brick and mortar in front of you.

The walking tour books are meticulously researched so you can go directly to those sites and learn about the building’s history as well as an introduction to some of the more interesting people associated with it.

Thank You

Sandy and I appreciate you visiting with us. We have some exciting things on the horizon and we’ll keep you updated as we go along.

Follow Stew:

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Find Stew’s books on Amazon and iBooks.

Blogs I Follow

Book Reviews

Please note that we do not and will not take compensation from individuals or companies mentioned or promoted in the blogs.

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Walks Through History

 

 

Copyright © 2018 Stew Ross